Farmers’ Market Locations

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Click to see a map of markets in your area.

Kent County

Fifer’s Farm & County Store
1919 Allabands Mill Road, Wyoming, DE
Fifer’s Farm & County Store Link

Modern Maturity Center Farmers’ Market
1121 Forrest Avenue, Dover, DE

Tidal Farmers’ Market
1313 Frederica Road, Frederica, DE
Tidal Farmers' Market Link

Twisted Steel Cattle Company
14255 S. DuPont Highway, Harrington, DE
Twisted Steel Cattle Company Link

New Castle County

Bellevue Farmers’ Market
510 Duncan Road, Wilmington, DE
Bellevue Farmers' Market Link

Brandywine Village Farmers’ Market
19th & Market Streets, Wilmington, DE
Brandywine Village Farmers' Market Link

Carousel Park Farmers’ Market
3700 Limestone Road, Wilmington, DE
Carousel Park Farmers' Market Link

Co-Op Farmers’ Market
230 E. Main Street, Newark, DE
Co-Op Farmers' Market Link

Food Bank of Delaware Farm Stand
222 Lake Drive, Newark, DE
Food Bank of Delaware Farm Stand Link

Glasgow Park Farmers’ Market
2275 Pulaski Highway, Newark, DE
Glasgow Park Farmers' Market Link

Highland Orchard Farm Market
1431 Foulk Road, Wilmington, DE
Highland Orchard Farm Market Link

The Market at Coverdale
543 Way Road, Greenville, DE
The Market at Coverdale Link

West Side Grows Farmers’ Market
West 10th and North Van Buren Streets, Wilmington, DE
West Side Grows Farmers’ Market Link

William Penn HS Farmers’ Market
713 E. Basin Road, New Castle, DE
William Penn HS Farmers' Market Link

Sussex County

ELIGIBLE FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND HERBS

Locally grown produce only

Fruits (raw or fresh only):

Herbs (fresh cut only):

Vegetables (raw or fresh only):

Fruits and vegetables harvest calendar

apple

Apples

July - November

asparagus

Asparagus

April - June

broccoli

Broccoli

June - August

cabbage

Cabbage

June - November

cantaloupe

Cantaloupe

June - September

cucumbers

Cucumbers

June - October

green-beans

Green Beans

June - October

peaches

Peaches

June - September

peppers

Peppers

July - October

Potatoes

Potatoes

June - August

Pumpkins

Pumpkins

August - November

Squash

Squash

July - September

Strawberries

Strawberries

May - June

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

June - October

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

June - October

Watermelon

July - October

SHOPPING TIPS

farmersmarket

Feeding a 10-12 Month Old

Breast milk is the most important source of nutrition for your baby, even after you start offering solid foods.

Feeding a 8-9 Month Old

Feed solids with a spoon. Never put cereal in a bottle.

Feeding a 6-7 Month Old

Feed solids with a spoon and from a bowl, never from a bottle.

Tips

Breast milk and formula feeding:

Around 2-3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months of age, babies may experience a growth spurt when they feed more often.

As they grow babies can hold more milk, so feedings may become further apart and take less time.

To prevent choking, always hold your baby when feeding. Never prop up a bottle to feed.

Start offering whole milk when your baby is one year old.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months and that breastfeeding continue for at least 12 months and beyond.

feeding-solid-foods

Feeding solid foods:

Wait to offer solid foods until your baby:

To prevent choking, always hold your baby when feeding. Never prop up a bottle to feed.

Try one new food at a time. Wait 5 days before trying another new food to watch for allergies. Food allergies may include wheezing, rash, or diarrhea.

Introduce peanut butter around 6 months. Spread a small, thin smear of peanut butter or nut butter thinly on a cracker.  Watch your baby for any reaction for the next 2 hours.

Babies under one year should NOT have honey or foods that can cause choking like nuts or whole grapes.

All babies are different. Talk with WIC or your baby’s healthcare provider about your baby’s needs.

Feeding Cues

Feeding a 4-5 Month Old

Before teeth come in, wipe gums with a soft, clean wash cloth after each feeding, especially before bed.

Feeding a 0-3 Month Old

Newborns have tiny tummies and need to be fed often. In the first few weeks, you may need to wake your baby to feed if they sleep longer than 4 hours.

Growth Spurts

Many babies are fussy during a growth spurt and will want to nurse longer and more often. This is called cluster feeding. This is your baby’s way of helping you increase your milk supply so that you can keep up with their needs. Remember, the more your baby nurses, the more milk your body makes.

Growth spurts can happen at any time, and every baby is different.

They often happen at these ages:

2 to 3 Weeks

6 Weeks

3 Months

6 Months

What foods can I get?